Friday-Saturday

Issued: Fri, Dec 02, 2016 at 8AM

Expires: Sat, Dec 03, 2016

Above 2,500ft High

1,500 to 2,500ft High

Below 1,500ft High

Degrees of Avalanche Danger ?

1. Low
2. Moderate
3. Considerable
4. High
5. Extreme

Avalanche Danger Rose ?

Avalanche Problems ?

Problem Details

This storm has built fresh storm slabs 30-90cm thick, above recent storm slabs from Tuesday. Natural avalanches are likely on steep wind loaded slopes, and some of them may be large. Human triggered slides are likely on slopes steeper than 30 degrees, any slides could be deep and deadly. It will take some time for these fresh storm slabs to bond and settle. If you head into the backcountry this weekend, know how to identify avalanche terrain, and stay well clear of it.

We also have a buried surface hoar layer in this zone, located roughly 1 meter deep, under Tuesday’s storm snow. Avalanches could occur on, or step down to, this layer, causing deep and wide propagation. This is most likely on sheltered north aspects.

Recent Avalanche Activity

Recent Weather

A strong storm is hitting the area Thursday night-Friday. Winds are strong out of the north at 20-40mph. 1.5-3″ of precipitation is expected by Friday evening, with snow levels at sea level. 8-16″ of wet snow is expected in the valleys, with 12-20″ over the mountains. Light-moderate snow will continue through Saturday evening, with an additional 5-10″ possible over the mountains. A major cool down is coming Sunday into next week, with strong north winds and dry offshore flow.

Additional Info & Media

Be extremely cautious venturing into the backcountry right now. There is a lot of new snow and human triggered avalanches are likely until the snow has more time to settle. Even small slides can pile up deep. Stay out of gullies, depressions, and terrain traps.

Posted in Transitional Zone Forecasts.
Erik Stevens

Forecaster: Erik Stevens