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DateNameLocationNew SnowWindsSky/CloudsLayersRecent Avalanche ActivityObservations/Assessments
March 14th -16thErik StevensTakhin Ridge~6"light, variablemostly cloudyBelow 3500 feet: Top meter of snow consisted of dense soft slab with two discernable interfaces within it, one at 15cm down, another at 60cm down. Ice crust 1m down with 3cm of small-grained facets atop it. No failures on compression or extended column tests. The 1m deep layer did fail with shovel shearing, the failure plane was rated a Q3 shear.Only two small pockets of deep slab (both R1D2), both of which were likely sympathetic step-downs from lots of debris coming down over them. They were located in the middle paths of large avalanche chutes, estimated angle around 35 degrees. N aspects.Snow on some slopes was very stable with hardly any sluffing even on steep slopes.

DateNameLocationNew SnowWindsSky/CloudsLayersRecent Avalanche ActivityObservations/Assessments
3/9/2014Jeffrey Moskowitz2,500ft NE aspects5-6" overnightgustyovercastUpper layers were less sensitive than the day prior but heavy wet snow existed all the way to 2,000ft. Saw outlined crowns from the day prior. Denser wind effect snow above tree line. Keep an eye on the wet heavy new snow load, as an avy cycle is likely over the next few days.

DateNameLocationNew SnowWindsSky/CloudsLayersRecent Avalanche ActivityObservations/Assessments
3/8/14Erik StevensNE aspects above Lutak/Chilkoot30-36"calmsnowing, 1"/hr all dayStorm layer 30cm down was naturally and actively avalanching on any slope steeper than 30 degrees. At least one crown stepped down deeper than this layer. Widespread D1 and D2 soft slabs. Several small human triggered slides, one of them sized D2.Extremely good skiing in the trees!

DateNameLocationNew SnowWindsSky/CloudsLayersRecent Avalanche ActivityObservations/Assessments
1/15/2014Jeffrey Moskowitz2,500ft NW Aspect Transitional12" previous stormS 5-10mphovercastDistinct new-snow old-snow interface slightly reactive when skinning. Compact snowpack underneath the new snow. None to report. Only settling of new snow. Alders are getting weighed down and filled in. Colder up the highway but still warm until 1,000+ ft.

DateNameLocationNew SnowWindsSky/CloudsLayersRecent Avalanche ActivityObservations/Assessments
1/13/2014Jeffrey Moskowitz2,500ft S Aspect2" previous stormS 10-15mphovercastNoticeable wind effected snow at ~2,500ft, visible loading occurring. Roughly 4-6" top layer of condensed slab. Jumped on some cornices and got fairly clean results on the newly formed wind slab. A few hallow sections. Be weary of what is above you. Stay keen on steep roll-overs and exposed areas prone to wind loading.

DateNameLocationNew SnowWindsSky/CloudsLayersRecent Avalanche ActivityObservations/Assessments
1/11/2014Jeffrey Moskowitz2,500ft S Aspectnonenoneclear; sunshineA few punchy and hallow sections of travel near tree-line. Noticed a crown on a N Aspect of Mt. Emerich above 5,000ft (perhaps 10ft deep?); buried crown on S-SW Aspect at 2,200ft, looked like a layer from the previous storm. Surface hoar ~3-4mm forming on S-SW Aspect, heard reports about this on N-Aspects today as well. Keep an eye on this layer after the next storm.

DateNameLocationNew SnowWindsSky/CloudsLayersRecent Avalanche ActivityObservations/Assessments
1/7/2014Jeffrey Moskowitz2,800ft N Aspect2" previous stormnonepartly Wet new snow. None to report. Identified slabs above tree line. Rain level had reached nearly 2,000ft.

DateNameLocationNew SnowWindsSky/CloudsLayersRecent Avalanche ActivityObservations/Assessments
1/5/2014Jeffrey Moskowitz2800ft N Aspect+8-10" storm snowlittle to noneovercastReactive storm layer consisting of the top ~8" of snow. Sliding of new-snow old-snow layer. Soft slab, predictable. Triggering isolated slabs in open areas above tree line and steep gullies between 2,500-3,000ft. Lots of new snow! Great coverage. Keep weary of steep roll-overs and terrain traps.

DateNameLocationNew SnowWindsSky/CloudsLayersRecent Avalanche ActivityObservations/Assessments
1/3/2014Jeffrey Moskowitz2800ft N Aspect4-6" previous stormlightovercastSnowpack had the new storm layer 4-6" sitting on top of a very thin rain crust. Below that was two feet of semi-consolidated snow. This layer was on top of a rain effected layers. To the ground was consolidated and I didn't observe any basal facets, instead it looked to be rounds (easily packable)snow. None to observe. Raincrust until 2,000ft sitting on top of unconsolidated powder. Previous warming cycle after the new year helped to set up a nice base.

DateNameLocationNew SnowWindsSky/CloudsLayersRecent Avalanche ActivityObservations/Assessments
12/18/2013Jeffrey Moskowitz1500ft N Aspect8"little to noneclearAt around 1,500ft observed a 5ft snowpack with nearly a foot of facets to the ground. The mid-pack consisted of 2-3ft of storm cycle rounds and a mix of rain crusts. Remainder was light new snow. At around 10:00 AM heard three consecutive rumbles across the inlet. Later through binoculars notice run-out debris above 3,000ft. It was hard to see a starting zone. Since it was so cold (7 degrees) and the sun had just begun to hit the high south facing slopes, any sort of existing slab may have been hyper sensitive to the direct solar radiation and temperature change. Looks like the mid-pack is gaining strength and skinning is good at the lower elevations. Snow line is to sea level! Keep an eye out for areas where an unsupported slab could form and become trigger points such as alders, rocks, and trees.

DateNameLocationNew SnowWindsSky/CloudsLayersRecent Avalanche ActivityObservations/Assessments
12/13/2013Jeffrey Moskowitz2500ft E-NE Aspect+36" previous storm; +24" during the daylight North windovercastSnowpack was light almost to the ground. In areas a condensed slab made for easier skinning. New snow totals were also very dry and loosely cohesive. Localized areas of whumphing caused by an un-supported slab on top of the old-snow new-snow layer, or where a wind slab had formed over vegetation or ground. More loose slabs were reactive throughout the day with new storm totals, the slab didn't have much energy. TOO MUCH SNOW!! We are often overwhelmed by powder on a big day, don't let your guard down, a wrong fall in bottomless snow can be very dangerous with the possibility of suffocation, or ingesting snow. Always have an escape route and use smart travel technique. Ullr was shinning down on us, but with deep powder should come an even deeper respect.


Disclaimer: Please note that this snowpack/hazard information is not funded or endorsed by any governmental organization. Use the data on this website at your own discretion as part of a thorough evaluation of the avalanche hazard in the field. Remember that conditions vary greatly from place to place and hour to hour, so evaluate the snow you find locally, and compare it to what you read on this website. We are not responsible for how you use the information contained on this site, and assume no liability for its use. Remember, information is no substitute for experience. Get educated in avalanche safety. The information on this website is not sufficient for completely safe backcountry decision making. Use at your own risk.