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Current Conditions

Last Updated: Thursday, April 21st, 2016 by Erik Stevens (Disclaimer | About This Page)
Expires 11pm on April 24th, 2016
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Zones (see map):
Avalanche Problem(s)
Lutak
Transitional
Chilkat Pass

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This Season:
November
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30
December
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
January
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
February
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
March
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
April
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31

Recent Weather Summary (Chart):

A front will move in Saturday, bringing .3-.6" of precipitation. Snow levels will be 3000-4000ft.

0.5-1.00" of precipitation fell Friday, with snow levels around 3000ft and light winds.

April 5th-9th: Nearly 1" of precipitation fell over mountain areas with snow levels above 3500ft and south winds.

March 30th-April 1st brought a major warm up with sunny skies, calm winds, and record high alpine temperatures that reached 50-55F at mountaintop level with little to no overnight freeze. This caused a widespread avalanche cycle with size D2-D3.5 wet and dry slabs on all aspects.

March 25th-26th around 1" of precipitation fell over mountain areas. Snow levels were near 2500ft much of the week. South winds were strong during this period.

Lutak Zone (see map)

Danger: Considerable See Scale
A big concern right now will be rain falling over an already wet snowpack between 2000 and 4000ft. Wet slides, both point release and wet slabs will be likely Saturday, anywhere the snow is wet. Stay out from below steep terrain where gullies and couloirs will be funnelling wet slide debris. On open slopes, wet sluffs will be heavy and powerful enough to easily take you into serious terrain.

Many cornices are still large and drooping. They are slowly but actively disintegrating and need to be carefully avoided. Stay way back from them on ridgelines as they tend to break further than expected.

Please send in any snow or weather observations. Natural avalanches, whumphs, shooting cracks, and slab avalanche activity is especially important to report.

Transitional Zone (see map)

Danger: Considerable See Scale
A big concern right now will be rain falling over an already wet snowpack between 2000 and 4000ft. Wet slides, both point release and wet slabs will be likely Saturday, anywhere the snow is wet. Stay out from below steep terrain where gullies and couloirs will be funnelling wet slide debris. On open slopes, wet sluffs will be heavy and powerful enough to easily take you into serious terrain.

Many cornices are still large and drooping. They are slowly but actively disintegrating and need to be carefully avoided. Stay way back from them on ridgelines as they tend to break further than expected.

Finally, on the highest, coldest north aspects there is a more layered and dangerous snowpack that may even include remnants of the March 14th surface hoar layer a meter or so down. Avoid these areas. If you decide to take the risk of riding on them, dig thoroughly to evaluate potential for failures in the top 1.5 meters of snowpack.

Please send in any snow or weather observations. Natural avalanches, whumphs, shooting cracks, and slab avalanche activity is especially important to report.

Chilkat Pass Zone (see map)

Danger: Considerable See Scale
A big concern right now will be rain falling over an already wet snowpack between 2000 and 4000ft. Wet slides, both point release and wet slabs will be likely Saturday, anywhere the snow is wet. Stay out from below steep terrain where gullies and couloirs will be funnelling wet slide debris. On open slopes, wet sluffs will be heavy and powerful enough to easily take you into serious terrain. Unfortunately there was a fatality this week caused by similar conditions. More details here.

Another danger to watch for will be on the highest, coldest north aspects. In these areas there will be fresh storm slabs, and a more layered and dangerous snowpack that may even include remnants of the March 14th surface hoar layer a meter or so down. Avoid these areas. If you decide to take the risk of riding on them, dig thoroughly to evaluate potential for failures in the top 1.5 meters of snowpack.

Many cornices are still large and drooping. They are slowly but actively disintegrating and need to be carefully avoided. Stay way back from them on ridgelines as they tend to break further than expected.

Please send in any snow or weather observations. Natural avalanches, whumphs, shooting cracks, and slab avalanche activity is especially important to report.


Disclaimer: Use the data on this website at your own discretion as part of a thorough evaluation of the avalanche hazard in the field. Remember that conditions vary greatly from place to place and hour to hour, so evaluate the snow you find locally, and compare it to what you read on this website. We are not responsible for how you use the information contained on this site, and assume no liability for its use. Remember, information is no substitute for experience. Educate yourself in avalanche safety. The information on this website is not sufficient for completely safe backcountry decision making. Use at your own risk.

All content copyright © 2016 Alaska Avalanche Information Center









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