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Current Conditions

Last Updated: Monday, April 21st, 2014 by Erik Stevens (Disclaimer | About This Page)
Expires 11pm on April 21st, 2014
Click Here for an encyclopedia of common snow science terms from the FSNAC

H.L. Maritime
Transitional
Pass
Biggest Threats
- Wet slabs

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This Season:
November
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30
December
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
January
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
February
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
March
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
April
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31

Recent Weather Summary (Chart):

March 8th-9th brought 3 feet of new low-density snow, turning warm and heavy at the end.

South winds on March 9th-13th raised snow levels to around 1500ft. Around a foot of wet snow likely fell above that level, with rain below.

On March 14th, 2 to 4 inches of snow fell above 1000ft, with steady temperatures. 2 to 4 additional inches fell on the 17th.

The rest of March into April was cold, clear, and windy.

Heavy precipitation on April 7th brought about a foot of wet snow above 2000ft, with rain below.

Temperatures have warmed to near freezing over the mountains, and have remained that way for about two weeks. Hard freezes at night are becoming less likely and less common.

High-Latitude Maritime Zones: Slopes near Haines

Danger: No Rating See Scale
This will be the last update of the 2013-2014 season. Regardless, avalanches will still be a concern through May.

We're into spring conditions with diurnal melt-freeze cycles and occasional storms with higher snow levels. You may find a large variety of conditions. The danger is generally low in the morning while the snow is still frozen, and rises quickly as the sun warms the snow. Here are some important notes for managing these conditions:

1) Keep an eye on overnight temperatures. Freeze thaw cycles are great for the snowpack, but watch out for nights where slopes don't get a solid freeze. Sun/warmth the next day will likely lead to wet slides. As the snowpack continues to warm and moisten over the next week or two, glide avalanches and full-depth wet slabs will begin. Be careful on warm sunny days.

2) If the snow is softening in the sun more than ankle-deep, it is time to get off of that slope. Wet slides will be the main concern as spring continues on and the days are warm.

3) Debris (ice, rock, and snow) is going to be falling from cliffs and steep areas. This activity is very dangerous and directly related to sunhit. Don't be below that big ice-covered cliff face when the sun is warming it. Couloirs and chutes tend to funnel this kind of debris.

4) Watch out for any new storm snow in higher elevations if any storms come in. Fresh winds slabs may build over an icy/facetted surface layer, and may be tender.

It has been another great season, and we look forward to tracking the snowpack once again in the late autumn. Please keep sending in observations, and share them publicly if you can.

Transitional Zones: Mountain areas seaward of interior passes

Danger: No Rating See Scale
See above for more information.

Chilkat Pass Zone:

Danger: No Rating See Scale
See above for more information.

Disclaimer: Use the data on this website at your own discretion as part of a thorough evaluation of the avalanche hazard in the field. Remember that conditions vary greatly from place to place and hour to hour, so evaluate the snow you find locally, and compare it to what you read on this website. We are not responsible for how you use the information contained on this site, and assume no liability for its use. Remember, information is no substitute for experience. Educate yourself in avalanche safety. The information on this website is not sufficient for completely safe backcountry decision making. Use at your own risk.

All content copyright © Alaska Avalanche Information Center, 2014









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